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Thank you Iron History and Thank You York Barbell


Guest John Barr

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Guest John Barr

Greetings everyone from Carlisle PA.

Thank you everyone here at Iron History for a great forum.

I'm 47 years old, mechanic by trade, family, etc.

Have been lifting York Barbell weights every day for 32 years now. Every morning, arise at 4am with a hot cup of coffee in hand, and head on out to my freezing cold garage. Still use the same old flat York bench from the 1970's which is wrapped in duct tape.

Hard to put into words, perhaps some of you know what I mean. The iron isn't cold, it's fellowship.

I don't look like a weight lifter, don't feel like one most of the time, but what little I have achieved in life, I owe to weight lifting.

Before I could afford York Weights, I would put concrete blocks on the ends of the bar, also car wheels.

I have never joined a public gym, though I think I was inside one once years ago.

There's a special place in my heart for York Barbell and the history it has stood for.

I've had John D. Fair's book, Muscletown USA since it first came out, and I often read through it, the research in there is great.

I think it was last year, I drove to York, found 51 North Broad st, where the old gym was.....(At least it sure looked like the old building.) I took the book with me, and looked at the picture of Bob Hoffman in his office, and across the street, the same houses are still there.

I looked up into the windows of the 2nd story and imagined Stan Stanczyk and Tommy Kono lifting up there so long ago......wow!!!.....unreal!!

I musta been there for hours. People passing by, all oblivious to the history, amazing.

Called York Barbell's office, some lady in marketing at the time said they still owned the building, but wasn't sure what they were gonna do with it.

I'd give anything to be able to go in there where the old gym was and just take in the great memories.

York Barbell's website won't open on my computer.

Edited by John Barr
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Joe Roark

John, welcome to ironhistory. Sometimes I think we should rename it ironhistory.calm because the guys (plus Julie) here feel at peace.

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Butch Kliem
Greetings everyone from Carlisle PA.

Thank you everyone here at Iron History for a great forum.

I'm 47 years old, mechanic by trade, family, etc.

Have been lifting York Barbell weights every day for 32 years now. Every morning, arise at 4am with a hot cup of coffee in hand, and head on out to my freezing cold garage. Still use the same old flat York bench from the 1970's which is wrapped in duct tape.

Hard to put into words, perhaps some of you know what I mean. The iron isn't cold, it's fellowship.

I don't look like a weight lifter, don't feel like one most of the time, but what little I have achieved in life, I owe to weight lifting.

Before I could afford York Weights, I would put concrete blocks on the ends of the bar, also car wheels.

I have never joined a public gym, though I think I was inside one once years ago.

There's a special place in my heart for York Barbell and the history it has stood for.

I've had John D. Fair's book, Muscletown USA since it first came out, and I often read through it, the research in there is great.

I think it was last year, I drove to York, found 51 North Broad st, where the old gym was.....(At least it sure looked like the old building.) I took the book with me, and looked at the picture of Bob Hoffman in his office, and across the street, the same houses are still there.

I looked up into the windows of the 2nd story and imagined Stan Stanczyk and Tommy Kono lifting up there so long ago......wow!!!.....unreal!!

I musta been there for hours. People passing by, all oblivious to the history, amazing.

Called York Barbell's office, some lady in marketing at the time said they still owned the building, but wasn't sure what they were gonna do with it.

I'd give anything to be able to go in there where the old gym was and just take in the great memories.

York Barbell's website won't open on my computer.

Hey John,

Welcome!!

I know what you mean about York barbell.

Wow... 4am work outs in a cold garage!! Amazing!!!

I am 47 too and I am impressed!!

Me and the family have visited the area near Carlisle several times to go to Hershey.

We went to Dieners in Mechanicsburg, PA the last time we were there. THe BEST breakfast I ever had!!!

Enjoy Iron History!!

BTW - I noticed that I have trouble with the York website whenever I am using Firefox or Safari as the web browser.

Butch

Edited by Butch Kliem
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Reuben Weaver

Welcome to IH John.

Here is a photo of the Broad Street Gym that was taken a several years ago (2001)

. If you look very close you can still make out the faded letters across the top. YORK BARBELL CO. Can you guess who that is standing out front?

Reuben

post-126-1233337725_thumb.jpg

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Joe Roark
Is that Jules Bacon?

Sure looks like Jules.

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Guest John Barr

Thanks for the replies Joe, Butch & Reuben,

You guys are great!

4am is the only time I can work out, in the freezing garage, the iron isn't cold for long though.

Reuben, nice photo of the old gym......hmmm........who is standing out front?

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Joe Roark
Steve & Joe are dead on, it is Jules Bacon !

Reuben

I did not check until Steve asked, then I enlarged the screen and agreed. Jules had sent a photo to me for my column and it sure looks like the photo you posted Reuben (facially I mean).

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Bob Hornick

Welcome John. I think you will enjoy the site. I admire your dedication to lifting weights. I had an aquaintence who attended the War College at Carlisle....a beautiful area of Pennsylvania, a state of which I am strongly connected by family. My Dad, his Father and Brothers all mined coal there.

I visited 51 N. Broad in York way back in 1955. I guess I'm one of only a handful here who have been there when the old building was still active. Dick Bachtel showed me around the place including the upstairs gym. In one part of the building I saw plates on hooks on automated cables, being dipped into a paint solution. In another area he was mixing and boxing their Hi Proteen, I bought some of that from Mr. Bachtel along with my first copy of Hoffman's "Weightlifting" book.

I wonder as well about the eventual fate of the old building at 51 N. Broad. If York sells it to another business I would hope that at least a small plaque commemorating it for it's history would be mounted on an outside wall. If, sadly, it is torn down one day I'd like to have a brick or two from the rubble. That building and those whom it housed had a profound and positive affect on me as a young man, one that still lasts.

Nothing in this life is forever. :(

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mike bondurant
Greetings everyone from Carlisle PA.

Thank you everyone here at Iron History for a great forum.

I'm 47 years old, mechanic by trade, family, etc.

Have been lifting York Barbell weights every day for 32 years now. Every morning, arise at 4am with a hot cup of coffee in hand, and head on out to my freezing cold garage. Still use the same old flat York bench from the 1970's which is wrapped in duct tape.

Hard to put into words, perhaps some of you know what I mean. The iron isn't cold, it's fellowship.

I don't look like a weight lifter, don't feel like one most of the time, but what little I have achieved in life, I owe to weight lifting.

Before I could afford York Weights, I would put concrete blocks on the ends of the bar, also car wheels.

I have never joined a public gym, though I think I was inside one once years ago.

There's a special place in my heart for York Barbell and the history it has stood for.

I've had John D. Fair's book, Muscletown USA since it first came out, and I often read through it, the research in there is great.

I think it was last year, I drove to York, found 51 North Broad st, where the old gym was.....(At least it sure looked like the old building.) I took the book with me, and looked at the picture of Bob Hoffman in his office, and across the street, the same houses are still there.

I looked up into the windows of the 2nd story and imagined Stan Stanczyk and Tommy Kono lifting up there so long ago......wow!!!.....unreal!!

I musta been there for hours. People passing by, all oblivious to the history, amazing.

Called York Barbell's office, some lady in marketing at the time said they still owned the building, but wasn't sure what they were gonna do with it.

I'd give anything to be able to go in there where the old gym was and just take in the great memories.

York Barbell's website won't open on my computer.

John,

You sound like "one of us" alright. Welcome!

Mike B.

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dan praydis

welcome aboard everyone here enjoys old weights and that york website won't open for me something is wrong with it :unsure:

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carl linich

Welcome John,I think you will enjoy this site. You will make many friends here.

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Guest John Barr

Thanks everyone for all the great replies.

Reckon I have a fondness for old buildings & history, & such. If Bob Hoffman bought the building in 1929, it must have been quite old already, it's amazing it still stands today, seemingly untouched.

Perhaps there's not much interest in the city of York for weightlifting history, or maybe it's a money issue. But for all the history in that old building, it's a shame it's just sitting there crumbling.

Edit:

Bob, if I ever hear that the old building is to be razed, I'll see if I can get you a brick or two.

Edited by John Barr
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Greetings everyone from Carlisle PA.

Thank you everyone here at Iron History for a great forum.

I'm 47 years old, mechanic by trade, family, etc.

Have been lifting York Barbell weights every day for 32 years now. Every morning, arise at 4am with a hot cup of coffee in hand, and head on out to my freezing cold garage. Still use the same old flat York bench from the 1970's which is wrapped in duct tape.

Hard to put into words, perhaps some of you know what I mean. The iron isn't cold, it's fellowship.

I don't look like a weight lifter, don't feel like one most of the time, but what little I have achieved in life, I owe to weight lifting.

Before I could afford York Weights, I would put concrete blocks on the ends of the bar, also car wheels.

I have never joined a public gym, though I think I was inside one once years ago.

There's a special place in my heart for York Barbell and the history it has stood for.

I've had John D. Fair's book, Muscletown USA since it first came out, and I often read through it, the research in there is great.

I think it was last year, I drove to York, found 51 North Broad st, where the old gym was.....(At least it sure looked like the old building.) I took the book with me, and looked at the picture of Bob Hoffman in his office, and across the street, the same houses are still there.

I looked up into the windows of the 2nd story and imagined Stan Stanczyk and Tommy Kono lifting up there so long ago......wow!!!.....unreal!!

I musta been there for hours. People passing by, all oblivious to the history, amazing.

Called York Barbell's office, some lady in marketing at the time said they still owned the building, but wasn't sure what they were gonna do with it.

I'd give anything to be able to go in there where the old gym was and just take in the great memories.

York Barbell's website won't open on my computer.

Welcome, Iron Man. Looks and feelings aside, You sure SOUND like a weight lifter. Bitten by the bug, it's in your blood!

Your perseverance is motivating, "young man". Perhaps, when you turn 50, indulge yourself. Skip a workout and sleep in! (Advice from an oldster...It works for me).

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jim eckhardt

Welcome to IH John. You will find many fine, like minded people here. Not to mention an endless supply of info about the history of the weight game.

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Butch Kliem
Welcome John. I think you will enjoy the site. I admire your dedication to lifting weights. I had an aquaintence who attended the War College at Carlisle....a beautiful area of Pennsylvania, a state of which I am strongly connected by family. My Dad, his Father and Brothers all mined coal there.

I visited 51 N. Broad in York way back in 1955. I guess I'm one of only a handful here who have been there when the old building was still active. Dick Bachtel showed me around the place including the upstairs gym. In one part of the building I saw plates on hooks on automated cables, being dipped into a paint solution. In another area he was mixing and boxing their Hi Proteen, I bought some of that from Mr. Bachtel along with my first copy of Hoffman's "Weightlifting" book.

I wonder as well about the eventual fate of the old building at 51 N. Broad. If York sells it to another business I would hope that at least a small plaque commemorating it for it's history would be mounted on an outside wall. If, sadly, it is torn down one day I'd like to have a brick or two from the rubble. That building and those whom it housed had a profound and positive affect on me as a young man, one that still lasts.

Nothing in this life is forever. :(

Hey All,

I thought you'd appreciate this.

Butch

post-1050-1233375380_thumb.jpg

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Bob Hornick
Thanks everyone for all the great replies.

Reckon I have a fondness for old buildings & history, & such. If Bob Hoffman bought the building in 1929, it must have been quite old already, it's amazing it still stands today, seemingly untouched.

Perhaps there's not much interest in the city of York for weightlifting history, or maybe it's a money issue. But for all the history in that old building, it's a shame it's just sitting there crumbling.

Edit:

Bob, if I ever hear that the old building is to be razed, I'll see if I can get you a brick or two.

Thanks very much John, but let's hope that fine old building is never demolished. It holds a lot of history, perhaps a ghost or two as well....yes an OLD building, even older than Joe Roark! :lol:

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