Jump to content

Introduction: Liam Tweed


Recommended Posts

Liam Tweed

Hi

As I have posted for the first time, I had better introduce myself.

I am 46, a Chartered Accountant by profession (the US call it "CPA"). My specialisation is Banking: Risk management . Based in Johannesburg South Africa.

I started training with weights at the age of 13, having been given a set by a neighbour (I was living in Rhodesia..now Zimbabwe), who took pity on watching this skinny kid "training" by running around in circles on the local common ground every day (I was a keen sprinter).

About a year later (1974) my sister started dating (and subsequently married) a national level weightlifter and shot putter/ hammer thrower. He introduced me to weightlifting and for many years sent me my training programes by mail (they moved to another town). At the age of 16 I c&j 100 lbs above bodyweight (256lbs) , this was considered a big deal at the time (guess it was because it was a small country...!)

One of the revalations that this association brought was the introduction to the muscle mags of the 50's and 60's (this was about 1976) as my now brother in law had a collection of S&H's, Iron mans etc that I needless to say, was fascinated with. I therefore literally "grew up" immersed in the lifting culture of that era. What an influence that turned out to be as I am now an avid collector of the muscle mags (about 1932 to present). As stange as this passion is, I was rather surprised to find that I was not the only such aflicted person, I am sure that some of the members of this forum can relate.

Competitive weightlifting achievements : 115kgs, snatch, 150 kg c&j at around 86 kg (training weights) at about 27 years of age. Also competed in the UK as a junior lifter for Buckinghamshire and South Midlands. Second in the SA senior champs (1980 and 1987). Very modest powerlifting (club level)...could'nt squat (still cant) to save my life.

I am presenty trying to build up basic strength again with thoughts of competing again as a master weightlifter and hammer thrower (yes, I picked up the throwing habit as well I'm afraid...!)

Anyway, I love this site..but Joe, I suppose I hav'nt posted as it does appear darn intimidating at times...kind of a hard core iron historian inner circle....hope I can eventually "muscle" my way in as a valid contributor.

Liam

Edited by Liam Tweed
Link to post
Share on other sites
Joe Roark

Liam,

Thank you for the introduction. Having often seen your name here, I was curious about your situation, so it is refreshing to now know some of your background.

My goal with this site has always been to strip away the personal bickering found so abundantly of many other sites, and concentrate of the history as it can be discovered and explained. The result has been a mixture of our members feeling safe from attacks, but at the same time, wary perhaps, of posting for fear of being corrected.

At any rate, we have many older members who have considerable savvy about history, but who always welcome more information.

Welcome aboard!

Joe

Link to post
Share on other sites
Ronald Mann

Hi Liam

Welcome from a fellow 'rugby nation' member :) - it's great to see your posts - please keep them coming.

Liam,please don't feel intimidated by any 'hard core inner circle' (as you term them) - as Joe mentioned,we all welcome additional information about the Iron Game. I already envy your collection of magazines,which goes back much further than any of mine do (I have none prior to 1955),and I have no doubts that I (for one) will benefit from your contributions.

Good luck with your aspirations as a Masters competitor,Liam

Regards and best wishes

Ron Mann

Link to post
Share on other sites
Liam Tweed

Hi Ron

Many thanks for the welcome and its great to know that the "all blacks" are well represented here on Iron History. I am a huge Arthur Lydiard / Peter Snell fan. Snell's book "No bugles, no drums", was one of my first sporting reads (school Library) and I now have a copy that has pride of place in my athletics book collection. Lydiards approach to training still influences modern middle and long distance training theory.

Link to post
Share on other sites
mike bondurant
Hi

As I have posted for the first time, I had better introduce myself.

I am 46, a Chartered Accountant by profession (the US call it "CPA"). My specialisation is Banking: Risk management . Based in Johannesburg South Africa.

I started training with weights at the age of 13, having been given a set by a neighbour (I was living in Rhodesia..now Zimbabwe), who took pity on watching this skinny kid "training" by running around in circles on the local common ground every day (I was a keen sprinter).

About a year later (1974) my sister started dating (and subsequently married) a national level weightlifter and shot putter/ hammer thrower. He introduced me to weightlifting and for many years sent me my training programes by mail (they moved to another town). At the age of 16 I c&j 100 lbs above bodyweight (256lbs) , this was considered a big deal at the time (guess it was because it was a small country...!)

One of the revalations that this association brought was the introduction to the muscle mags of the 50's and 60's (this was about 1976) as my now brother in law had a collection of S&H's, Iron mans etc that I needless to say, was fascinated with. I therefore literally "grew up" immersed in the lifting culture of that era. What an influence that turned out to be as I am now an avid collector of the muscle mags (about 1932 to present). As stange as this passion is, I was rather surprised to find that I was not the only such aflicted person, I am sure that some of the members of this forum can relate.

Competitive weightlifting achievements : 115kgs, snatch, 150 kg c&j at around 86 kg (training weights) at about 27 years of age. Also competed in the UK as a junior lifter for Buckinghamshire and South Midlands. Second in the SA senior champs (1980 and 1987). Very modest powerlifting (club level)...could'nt squat (still cant) to save my life.

I am presenty trying to build up basic strength again with thoughts of competing again as a master weightlifter and hammer thrower (yes, I picked up the throwing habit as well I'm afraid...!)

Anyway, I love this site..but Joe, I suppose I hav'nt posted as it does appear darn intimidating at times...kind of a hard core iron historian inner circle....hope I can eventually "muscle" my way in as a valid contributor.

Liam

Liam,

Welcome to the forum! Hope you got those magazines we mailed the second time...remember?

Mike BonDurant

The Muscle Museum

Link to post
Share on other sites
Liam Tweed
Liam,

Welcome to the forum! Hope you got those magazines we mailed the second time...remember?

Mike BonDurant

The Muscle Museum

I sure did Mike, thanks . I still get a huge kick out of every magazine order that I receive. Guess some guys never grow up..!

Liam

Link to post
Share on other sites
Ronald Mann
Hi Ron

Many thanks for the welcome and its great to know that the "all blacks" are well represented here on Iron History. I am a huge Arthur Lydiard / Peter Snell fan. Snell's book "No bugles, no drums", was one of my first sporting reads (school Library) and I now have a copy that has pride of place in my athletics book collection. Lydiards approach to training still influences modern middle and long distance training theory.

Hi Liam

Despite our provincial rugby teams doing so well in the 'super twelve' (now fourteen) competition and the All Blacks dominating the Bledisloe Cup against Australia each year,curiously enough winning the really 'big one' (the World Cup) has continued to evade them since their victory at the inaugural event in 1987 - hopefully this may all change later this year :).

Arthur Lydiard was (IMHO) truly one of the greatest athletic coaches of alltime - sadly he passed away in December 2004 (at the age of 87) during a lecture tour in Texas. I was fortunate enough to see Peter Snell run on several occasions in the early 1960's and I can still remember those races well - he was magnificent to watch in action

Regards and best wishes

Ron

Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome, Liam. Yes, I would say that C&Jing 100 lbs. over bodyweight at the age of 16 was indeed a big deal. I believe I managed to C&J only a pound or two over my bodyweight right about the time of my 16th birthday.

You went on to make some nice lifts.

Tom

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.